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Effects of Stretching on Flexible Organic Electronic Structures

dc.contributor.authorOyewole, Oluwaseun Kehinde
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-10T15:58:57Z
dc.date.available2017-01-10T15:58:57Z
dc.date.issued2011-12-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://repository.aust.edu.ng:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/541
dc.description.abstractThis work presents the responses of optical properties and mechanical failure of layers of stretchable organic electronic structures under tension using analytical, simulations, and experimental techniques. The interfacial contact around dust particles was modelled. The deformation induced during stretching was also modelled before simulating the stress distributions and calculating the crack driving forces of the layers using finite element analysis. The finite element simulation of adhesion and contact around dust particle was done to fully understand the effects of adhesion on contact length of a two-layer structure. To understand how these structures behave under service condition, a stretchable organic electronic was fabricated. Each of the fabricated layers was fully characterized to know how their optical property and grain structure are being affected under monotonic loading. The adhesion forces and values of surface roughness of the layered structures were also measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The adhesion forces were incorporated into developed models along with their material properties, in order to calculate their interfacial adhesion energies. The results obtained are, therefore, summarized.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectOyewole Oluwaseun Kehindeen_US
dc.subjectProf Wole Soboyejoen_US
dc.subject2011 Theoretical Physics Thesesen_US
dc.subjectOrganic Electronic Structuresen_US
dc.titleEffects of Stretching on Flexible Organic Electronic Structuresen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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  • Theoretical and Applied Physics46

    This collection contains selected research work by Theoretical and Applied Physics Students at the Masters level, from 2009-2019.

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